Overview

State 2 is now open for proposals. The deadline to submit is 23 September, 2018.

 

Applicants may apply to participate in Panels and Themed Exchange Portfolios. Please send inquiries and submissions directly to the Chairs / Organizers listed below. Be prepared to provide a bio, statement of intent, short resume, and sample images along with basic information about yourself. Panel Chairs and Portfolio Organizers may request additional materials.

 

Additionally, proposals to lead a Mobile Event are being accepted. Please complete the online form below.

 

To encourage diverse programming, we ask that members participate in one refereed event per call. For example, one person cannot serve on two panels or participate in more than one themed portfolio for the 2019 conference, but that same person can serve on one panel while participating in one themed portfolio.

 

Please note that SGCI is working to reduce costs for our entire membership and is evaluating our registration waiver policy. We will announce our new waiver structure when registration launches.

 

Participants must be SGCI members in good standing.

 

Having technical difficulties with your Mobile Events submission? Email hello@tocco.work .

Proposal Types

State 2 proposals are accepted in the following areas:

 

Mobile Event such as Three-Minute Thesis, Mobile Inkubator, or Pecha Kucha on-the-go: a new initiative for the 2019 Texchange conference, mobile events are demo kits, projects, discussions, performances, or talks intended to take place on conference buses while in transit between venues. Flexible and innovative proposals are encouraged!

 

Panel: a topic of discussion pertaining to anything of interest to printmakers and print enthusiasts. Panel Chairs were selected in State 1. In State 2, you may apply to be a Panelist. Send inquiries directly to the Panel Chairs listed below.

 

Themed Portfolio Exchange: a portfolio curated by an SGCI Member. Themed Portfolio Exchange Chairs were selected in State 1. In State 2, you may apply to participate in the exchange. Send inquiries directly to the Themed Portfolio Exchange Chairs listed below.

 

For more details, see FAQ.

Selection Criteria

1. Artistic or Academic Merit (20%)

 

Proposals will be evaluated on their artistic, pedagogical, intellectual, and entrepreneurial value. High-scoring panels will be artistically meritorious and intellectually significant, with a roster of talented artists or accomplished experts on the topic.

 

2. Importance to Members (20%)

 

How important is it to attendees that our conference offer this topic? Proposals will be evaluated in terms of whether they will be new and important to a significant number of our attendees. These constituencies include but are not limited to students, emerging professionals, academics, program directors, publishers, print shops, and individual practitioners. Whether a similar activity been offered in recent programming will be considered.

 

3. Diversity (20%)

 

Proposals will be evaluated on their potential to bring artistic, intellectual, regional, political, ethnic, and cultural diversity to the conference, and how they address the needs of all communities working in printmaking.

 

4. Proposal Integrity (20%)

 

Is the necessary information (event description, statement of merit, biographical notes) complete and useful? Are the moderator and/or presenters reliable professionals? The goals of the proposal and the ability of the presenters to fulfill them will be evaluated.

 

5. Feasibility (20%)

 

Is the proposed activity realistic and achievable? Are facilities and resources available to support it?

Apply Now

Call for Panels

Critical Comics


Organizer:

Joseph Lupo, Professor of Art, West Virginia University
https://josephlupo.com/



Email:

joseph.lupo@mail.wvu.edu



Abstract:

Since their inception over 100 years ago, comics have been used to express critical judgements of contemporary society. More recently visual artists have been co-opting and appropriating comic imagery and visual strategies to express unique personal viewpoints and critical social statements. Why is this and who are the comics creators and visual artists using comics imagery and visual language to express a critical dialog? This panel is designed for artists that use comics in their work or for those interested in the history of artists appropriating comics.



Description:

This panel relates to the Texchange theme in that it focuses the “contributions to other art media, and larger cultural roles.” I will be seeking out panel participants that utilize comics imagery and visual language to make critical statements in their work, or artists interested in exploring and presenting this history.

We are in a very interesting moment for American comics. The diversity of current American comic creators and subjects is unparalleled from any other time. The rise of independent publishers and access to self-publishing has brought us to a moment that many comics creators and fans have been waiting decades for. There are American comics educating us about pharmaceutical drugs, comics written by an African American Congressman from Georgia about civil rights and the 1960’s, there are biographical comics about professional wrestlers, and comics educating us about proper “they/them” pronoun use.

Since the Pop Art movement, American comic artists have had a very uneasy relationship with contemporary art. Most comic creators in the 1960’s and 70’s rightly believed Pop artists weren’t invested in comics enough to make any serious statement about the subject. Pop artists were interested in the medium’s visual capabilities and didn’t investigate the conceptual potential any further. “Art School Confidential” a four-page black-and-white satirical comic by Daniel Clowes and Art Spiegelman’s “High Art Lowdown” are great examples of comics’ distrust of the “Fine Art” world.

But the dynamics of suspicion, media separation, and white male dominance has changed dramatically since the days of Warhol and Lichtenstein. There are a slew of visual artists interested in using comics language to express their ideas. Inka Essenhigh, Arturo Herrera, Aiden Koch, Deb Sokolow, Ida Applebroog, Kerry James Marshall, Gary Simmons, Ellen Gallagher, and Chris Sperandio are examples of contemporary visual artists interested in using comics as a reference to create a more critical dialog between their work and the viewer.

The separation between comics and “fine art” becomes even more blurry when we consider our own community. The popularity of comics is directly tied to the evolution of commercial printing. It seems natural that artists interested in utilizing printing processes for the dissemination of images and ideas would be drawn to using the visual language of comics. In the early 20th Century, artists Frans Masereel and Lynd Ward made what could be considered the first attempts at crossing over the boundaries of traditional printmaking and comics. Currently, artists like Bill Fick, Aaron Coleman, Sage Perrott, Jenny Schmid, and Ryan Standfest are seeking to blur or obliterate the lines between comics and traditional print.

Since there is precedent and wide acceptance for contemporary artists to co-opt and appropriate comic imagery and visual strategies, it seems like a perfect time to analyze this relationship. Why does referencing or appropriating the comics visual language work to express a critical dialog in printmaking? This panel is designed for artists that use comics in their work and for artists interested in exploring the history of artists appropriating comics.



Get Schooled: How to be Old School, an Old Fart, an Old Dog with New Tricks!


Organizer:

Charles Beneke, Professor of Art, University of Akron, Myers School of Art



Email:

beneke@uakron.edu



Abstract:

Today’s students are a different beast! They are lithe, savvy, spry, and . . . , well, current. How can we teach to who they are rather than stiffly to ourselves and ineffectively to who we think they are? Join ten recent graduates for an action-packed, fun-filled, fast-paced, no-finger- pointing-allowed schooling! Each grad will present a real-life scenario that happened to one of their co-panelists and through their observations teach us what might have worked better. Step outside of your comfort zone, leap into the fire, burn it down, and rise from the cinders an old dog with a whole new perspective!



Description:

As educators we don’t hesitate to point out how fast our world is changing and our liberal hearts don’t fail to acknowledge that the ability to relate empathetically is essential today. We incorporate new media into our curricula, we loosen our definitions of printmaking, and we work to prepare students for evolving career options beyond the traditional models that seem to always circle back to academia. But, we still need work on shaking loose the old ideas that worked so well for this generation of educators and allowing ourselves instead to shake it up. Today’s students have grown up in an entirely different world and we need to teach to who they are. We aren’t so good at looking at education from their perspectives and understanding what they need as individuals. If we don’t know where our MOs are misaligned, how are we to shift and evolve?



The Ghost in the Machine


Organizer:

Brendan Baylor, Assistant Professor, Old Dominion University; and Sarah Pike, Artist and Owner, FreeFall Laser
http://www.brendanbaylor.com
http://www.freefall-laser.com



Email:

bbaylor@odu.edu

sarah@freefall-laser.com



Abstract:

Rapid prototyping technologies (3D printing, laser engraving, CNC milling, plotters, etc.) have quickly spread from the factory floor to garages, studios, and printshops. As artists investigate these new media, they raise questions about the social, economic, and political meanings of these tools. What codes, conventions, and resonances are embedded within the technologies we use? How do we as printmakers take advantage of the conceptual opportunities of rapid prototyping technologies? The artist and printmakers on this panel explore conceptual spaces opened up by these new technologies in order to transform how we see and shape our worlds.



Description:

While many previous demonstrations and panels have addressed the technical possibilities of rapid prototyping, there has been much less reflection on the conceptual dimensions of these technologies. I’m particularly interested in foregrounding print projects with a critical or political bent that integrate CNC, laser, plotter, or 3D printed aspects. Because these technologies are emerging primarily from manufacturing, they have a strong connection to industry and manufacturing. The automated production precision available to individual artists now was the realm of million-dollar manufacturing facilities of the past. This association with concentrated power or capital can persist in viewing the products of these techniques.

Other possible conceptual connections could include:
• The use of robots or automated equipment in art that further erodes or troubles our notions of authorship and artistic production.
• The way in which using lasers and robots relates to modernist ideologies of progress and faith in the future.
• Destructive or violent production techniques (lasers, routing, cutting) serving as a metaphor for real-world violence.

This panel will enrich our understanding of rapid prototyping as site of both technical and conceptual possibility. The artists included will push us to think about our print techniques not as stand-alone media and disciplines, but as techniques with rich social, political, and historic connections. This interchange between the technical, social, and political will compliment and enrich the dialogue of Texchange 2019 and the broader print community.



LatinX Printmaking


Organizer:

Michael Menchaca, Visual Artist
https://michaelmenchaca.com/home.html



Email:

mcmvectors@gmail.com



Abstract:

I propose to facilitate a panel discussion regarding a Latinx ethos in contemporary printmaking. The Latino, or "Latinx" identity, is inherently connected to Texas history and has been historically stigmatized through print materials. We will talk about the history of prints as a tool for social influence and the ethics behind the printmaker's intentions. The theme of Texchange is connected to the Latino heritage within the Tejano population that identifies with both U.S. and Mexican cultures.



Description:

I propose to facilitate a panel discussion regarding social justice printmaking in Texas from a latinx perspective. Topics will range from historical prints distributed as a propaganda tool to influence Texas legislation, the exchange of ideas through printmaking, to the ethics of addressing "trending" issues within contemporary prints. The legacy of printmaking within latinx communities in the U.S. is undeniable, but is even more so in Texas, sharing a physical border with Mexico. The panelists will also discuss why printmaking is their chosen medium for expressing their political views, any difficulties experienced producing or exhibiting their work, and their perspective on what it means to identify as a latinx artist today. The theme of Texchange is connected to the Latino heritage within the Tejano population that identifies with both U.S. and Mexican cultures.



Material of the Immaterial: Contemporary production / consumption


Organizer:

Alex Linfield, MFA Candidate, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design; and Morgan Melenka, MFA Candidate, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design
http://alexlinfield.com/
http://www.morganmelenka.com/



Email:

alexlinfield@nscad.ca

morganmelenka@nscad.ca



Abstract:

This panel will engage with questions surrounding printmaking and digital media.

We are interested in how a largely immaterial matrix (code of a digital file) intersects with the traditionally physical discipline of printmaking. Panelists can speak to how a changing relationship to matrices affects their relationship to limitations and materiality, and how the digital has changed practices in print.



Description:

This panel reflects on the relationship of reproducibility in both printmaking and digital media, noting when they diverge and overlap. In digital media physical matrices disappear and the tools of reproducible media shift into interfaces connected to an ever elusive elsewhere. In an era where our lives are uploaded, dematerialized, and contained in a space of code and electricity, how do we address our shifting relationship to print’s traditional role in material reproduction? While making information and images easier than ever to copy and distribute, digital media has radically changed our concepts of reproducibility at a rate not seen since the first printing press. However, unique to 2019 is the moment where analogue concepts of the original, copy, and matrix mix and integrate with the digital to destabilize and reinvent reproducible media. The outcome is a period in time where change becomes not only redundant, but the new normal as matrices, images, and code are not only reproducible themselves but are able to do so to an unfathomable edition number with their own agency.

The panel is open to discussion on topics ranging from the implications of 3D printing, CNC cutting, and the ubiquity of digital images and their effect on traditional printmedia. Additionally, we encourage thinking about hardware v.s software, different forms of matrices (material and immaterial), and the replacement of tools by digital interfaces as new paradigms in printmaking. How do these new media affect print’s role in subverting or conforming to contemporary proliferation?



More Than the Border Exchange: Crossing Culture through Printmaking


Organizer:

Freda Sue, Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina Upstate
http://www.fredasue.com



Email:

fredasueginwen@gmail.com



Abstract:

This panel invites panelists to share their experiences in crossing cultural background through printmaking.

For many immigrant artists, dealing with the change of the change of geographical location and verbal language are expected. However, coping with the cultural shifted aftershock could be a much longer process. Printmaking, a visual art form that includes varied processes and textures. Its characters and community have provided immigrant artists opportunities to associate and contribute from the inside out. This panel will provide an opportunity for immigrant printmakers to share their own stories of journeying through the cultural shift.



Description:

Awkward middle ground

Let’s face it, the culture fissure exits. It’s our intuition to look steadily at the need for immigrants’ external transition. While taking care of the necessity is essential, the ladder of bridging the cultural and cultural gap often got overlooked. One day during my second year of teaching, one of my students who came from Japan asked me while we both were working in the print shop: “Do you ever find yourself stuck in the awkward middle ground of cultural exchange?” I ponder on that question for a long time. During my beginning study at the university, I often found myself having difficulties to communicate, and yes, language is one of the reasons. However, what hinders me for a long time was not able to grab hold of the common ground for applying social allegory and references. Throughout time, I did not lose myself in a new culture, but I rediscover a different part of me under a new cultural context. William S. Sax puts it this way in a book about pilgrimage: “People and the places where they reside are engaged in a continuing set of exchanges; they have determinate, mutual effects upon each other because they are part of a single, interactive system.”

Storytelling through a community

Printmaking itself is a celebration of diversity. From the handing down technical methods across a rich historical timeline to various materials were employed during the processes, the art form of printmaking relates the experience in our daily life closely. Memory comes from experience, and moments of experience can trigger the memory. Bell Hooks stated in her book Belonging: A Culture of Place: “Memories offer us a world where there is no death, where we are sustained by rituals of regard and recollection.” I wondered about my sentimental attachment towards woodcut relief, until it dawned on me, the motion of carving reminds me when my father held my hands and taught me how to sharpen a pencil with a utility knife for the first time. I get to embrace the sense of home through carving in the midst of my U.S. apartment.

To cross the cultural barrier, first, we must understand the difference between the external cultural skin and the internal cultural root. When I first came to the U.S., the most difficult cultural encounter wasn’t the language nor food, but the cultural references which I cannot learn it through a period, I had to experience through it. As an immigrant artist, I learn and seek to communicate through universal language, to share the stories that came from the common ground of human relationship and experience. Printmaking community has known for its supporting network regardless of country or region. Whether through the exchanging the knowledge of the material processes or the sensation of cultural experiences, printmakers have many opportunities to collaborate, not only to build a welcoming environment but to contribute each other’s growth from inside out.



Print as Facilitator of Action


Organizer:

Henry Gepfer, Adjunct Professor, Millersville University and Gettysburg College
http://www.henrygepfer.com



Email:

LGEPFER@GMAIL.COM



Abstract:

Printmaking occupies a curious, central space in a Venn diagram consisting of fine art, industry and craft which positions it as a uniquely appropriate medium through which action can be channeled. In recent art history, action in print has taken various forms including performance, participatory works and political action. This panel invites contemporary printmakers or scholars to showcase projects or research that address one or multiple facets of action channeled through the medium of print. The goal of this panel is dually to expand the vocabulary of possibility within print as well as bolster the surrounding conversation.



Description:

Printmaking occupies a curious, central space in a Venn diagram consisting of fine art, industry and craft which positions it as a uniquely appropriate medium through which action can be channeled. Spanning these three cultural positions, the invention of moveable type is a good example to illustrate this point. Stemming from a long line of sources, moveable type incited the continual democratization of information; an often cited positive consequence of print-media in discussions surrounding its continued relevance. But, thinking bigger picture, in addition to the marked action and figurative movement of information spurred on by this innovation, the very act of printing itself calls to mind a very physical, action-oriented process: consider illustrations of printers using a Gutenberg press whose bodies strain backward, pulling the lever cross-press to gain a solid impression. While their pose is nothing short of athletic, the printed word in tradition also calls to mind a quieter, less dramatic action: the call and response of articulation and analysis.

Within the world of contemporary fine art, we can find both, the physical and conceptual actions linked to printmaking in the forms of performative, participatory and politically incisive actions. In a performative vein, we can think about the mechanical printing process as re-imagined organically via the body in the distanced Anthropometries of Yves Klein or the more intimate, nearly photographic body prints by David Hammons. Examples of participation in print include Mel Chin’s Fundred Dollar Bill project which allows viewers to draw into printed facsimile currency to draw attention to lead contamination in New Orleans while the takeaway prints in Felix Gonzalez-Torres’ Untitled (Double Portrait) address more contemplative ideologies and economies. Politically motivated works such as the printed matter of the Guerilla Girls could be considered alongside aids-centric protest poster work of ACT UP.

This panel invites contemporary printmakers or scholars to showcase projects or research that address one or multiple facets of action cultivated through the medium of print. The goal of such a panel is dually to expand the vocabulary of possibility within print as well as the surrounding analytical conversation to echo and continue the call and response dynamic of print-material consumption.



Social Practice and Printmaking Collectives: Then and Now


Organizer:

Celeste De Luna, Lecturer, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley; and Laura Berman, Professor, Kansas City Art Institute
http://www.celestedeluna.com
http://www.laurabermanprojects.com/



Email:

delunaceleste@gmail.com

lberman@kcai.edu



Abstract:

Printmaking and prints have long been associated with accessibility, distribution of information, versatility of form, and cultural impact. This panel will take this role and expand on printmaking in social practice and community-oriented art, a field of art practice which aims to create social/political change in the creation of art while enhancing community itself. Presenters will focus on their own experiences with social practice and community-oriented printmaking as well as take a historical look at printmaking in regards to social practice and cultural impact. Discussing the role of printmakers and prints have had and currently have in the expanding field of social practice art, creative place-keeping and community-oriented art fits in perfectly with Texchange’s focus on shared spaces, collaborations, and creating change together.



Description:

Four to six artists/printmakers will each present 10 minute presentations on printmaking and social engagement practices. Panelists will focus on their own specific research of social practice and printmaking collectives, including: historical movements, artist communities and political prints. (40-60 minutes) Topics addressed will include: What goes beyond creating work together in collaborative spaces? Why does printmaking work well with these ideas and art practices? How do printmakers uniquely engage their communities?

The panelists will then engage in a discussion on the following topics: How can printmaking create social change? What is the historical precedent for printmaking and socially engaged art, and how does this history inform current practices? Is the traditional print enough? How can academics in printmaking use their positionality to create resources for the larger community? What is creative placemaking versus place-keeping? What are the  best practices on working with community? What are some strategies that have been used with community liaisons and focus groups? What are the best practices to create pop up workshop spaces that promote safety, respect for the community, and efficiency for groups of people? What kind of language are we using when working with marginalized populations? What are the challenges on working with communities experiencing  gentrification and displacement? How is sustainability addressed?

Some examples of artists and collectives we will look at closely include: Self-Help Graphics, Kelmscott Press, Swoon, Folly Cove Designers, Just Seeds, Bread & Puppet Theater, Women’s Studio Workshop and others. The history, impact, successes and challenges that these organizations and artists create will be discussed.

The panel will conclude with a Q&A session with the audience. This panel is not intended to be a comprehensive on social practice but it’s focus is on lending printmakers some tools and strategies to delve into social practice with self-awareness, practicality, and knowledge of precedents in the field.



Themed Portfolios

Beyond 72 dpi: thepostdigitalprintmaker


Organizer:

Phyllis Merriam, Artist
https://thepostdigitalprintmaker.tumblr.com



Email:

phyllis@ourownart.com



Abstract:

Today for work to be shared it must be created with the knowledge that most people will only see digital reproductions limiting the ability to communicate the nuance that can only be seen by viewing a piece in person. We wonder whether this pressure effects how artists create their work. The pieces chosen will have a physical aspect that can only be fully appreciated in person––we will ask each artist to explain this aspect of their print. We will display the print accompanied by a 2” X 2” thumbnail of the artist’s original submission for comparison along with the artist’s explanation and the description.



Description:

As thepostdigitalprintmaker we share the work of printmakers who have taken up the challenge of incorporating emerging technologies into their practices. We have created a vibrant online community of over 7,000 followers throughout the world.

In February of 2017 we curated Virtual to Physical, thepostdigitalprintmaker. We chose 16 artists from our online community to show and discuss their work in a physical gallery in New York. Curating this show highlighted for us a problem that all artists and curators face - a 72 dpi image is simply not an accurate representation of a physical work of art.

It is natural for thepostdigitalprintmaker to be reaching beyond 72 dpi. While social media allows us to expand our reach and interact with fellow artists from around the world, it limits our ability to communicate the nuance that can only be seen by viewing a piece in person. Whenever we are able to see a print from the blog in person it is almost always surprising - one thinks it would be smaller, or larger, be less textured or have more contrast.

It is a reality that all work must be created with the knowledge that most people will only see the digital reproductions since all social media and almost all open calls rely on them. However, prints have their greatest ability to change thought processes and bring us together through physical viewing and in interpersonal discourse. We wonder how the need to communicate digitally affects how artists create their work.

In curating this portfolio exchange and show we will choose artists who have integrated emerging technology into their traditional printmaking practices as we do for the blog. The pieces chosen will also have a physical aspect such as texture that can really only be fully appreciated in person––we will ask each artist to explain this aspect of their piece as part of our selection process.

All the works will be on 8.5” X 11” paper. We will display the print accompanied by a 2” X 2” thumbnail of the jpeg that was sent to the open call as well as the artists' statement. The portfolio will be distributed as a book so that it can be handled and appreciated after the show is over. After the show is over we will post the portfolio on our blog and Instagram to complete the circle back to 72 dpi. We will limit the portfolio to 15 works. The cost to each participant will be $50.

This exchange will focus on technology’s impact on viewing, communicating and creating work. Our community embraces technology and what it has to offer, but we also must understand the constraints that it imposes. This is not a new idea; printmakers that came before us dealt with same issues as new technologies always change the way prints are made and distributed. Texchange is an ideal venue for some real discussion of the challenges facing artists in the 21st century.

Edition size: 17 (15 participants, 1 copy for SGCI Archives, 1 display copy)

Paper Size: 8.5“ x 11“



Between Tenses


Organizer:

Beth Sheehan, Printer, Durham Press



Email:

sheeprints@gmail.com



Abstract:

The Between Tenses exchange portfolio explores ideas of time and memory as connection to human experience and personal narrative. Memories are integral to a sense of self and how we relate to others. Through printmaking, participants are encouraged to investigate the influences of the past (personal or public) on the present and future. How does the perception of the past alter current experience? How does time change experience? What is lost from our narratives with the malleability of memory? And what does that mean for us or the way we relate to the world?



Description:

The Between Tenses exchange portfolio explores ideas of time and memory as connection to human experience and personal narrative. Memories are integral to a sense of self and how we relate to others. Through printmaking, participants are encouraged to investigate the influences of the past (personal or public) on the present and future. How does the perception of the past alter current experience? How does time change experience? What is lost from our narratives with the malleability of memory? And what does that mean for us or the way we relate to the world?

“The individual events of your life will be transmuted into another substance called memory and in the mechanism something will be lost and you will never be able to reverse it, you will never again have the original moment back in its uncategorized, preprocessed state.” - Charles Yu

Participants are expected to produce an edition of prints using two or more printing techniques where the primary printing technique is a more traditional, hand-pulled technique (not digital, although digital printing may be used to aid the primary printing technique if required). The interaction between printing techniques acts as an additional framework for the conceptual play between past and present or present and future.

Edition size: 18 (16 participants, 1 copy for SGCI Archives, 1 display copy)

Paper Size: 12“ x 18“

Cost: $20 for portfolio materials



Environmentality


Organizer:

Leah Kiczula, Education Coordinator, SCRAP PDX



Email:

littlewitchprints@gmail.com



Abstract:

Environmentality looks to delve into the effects of printmaking on -and in- our environments. Reflecting on the way the environment is experienced and imagined, I invite printmakers to create works addressing the current state of our environmental crisis, the emergent effects of crisis of personal space intersecting with the sense of a menacing ecological crisis, while using 100% reused materials and environmentally sustainable methods. Environmentality will offer the opportunity to rethink the relations between art and environment, both physical and symbolic, material and immaterial, how do our own artistic actions affect this planet we inhabit.



Description:

The imagined environment of a printmakers personal space as a mark maker puts one at odds with with the struggling ecological environment of the planet. Printmaking is a notoriously toxic art form, but also a truly alchemic and amazing process. Every piece of art leaves a footprint, artistically, emotionally, and ecologically. Environmentality will invite printmakers to utilize methods and perspectives that dwell in the realm of environmental sustainability. Using 100% reusable materials, from resurfacing old copper plates to printing on paper bags, participants will explore how to drive one’s art practice while maintaining an ecological balance that benefits the material Earth. Confronted with one's own environmental footprint, what kinds of (Tex)changes will be undertaken to advance oneself toward sustainability while balancing the imagined space of defining oneself as a printmaker? Traveling through real and imagined space, the immediate locality to the most remote boundaries of knowledge and experience of environmentality will be explored.

Edition size: 21 (19 participants, 1 copy for SGCI Archives, 1 display copy)

Paper Size: variable up to 20“ x 15“

Cost: $25



Habitus: Contemplative Manifesto


Organizer:

Andrew Kozlowski, Assistant Professor, University of North Florida; and Sheila Goloborotko, Assistant Professor, University of North Florida
http://www.andrewkozlowski.com
http://www.goloborotko.com



Email:

a.kozlowski@unf.edu

s.goloborotko@unf.edu



Abstract:

This portfolio offers a platform to express, comment, and reflect on the current issues that are rapidly reshaping our world—creating a print that is not reactive—but pensive and meditative.

It is overwhelming to observe the torrent of information flowing past and be swept up in the churning tide. Can we create imagery that is not merely pamphletary and reactive but portrays the moment before our responses? We aim to gather a collection of visual contemplative manifestos—work that slows one down, that proposes change and creates pause with voices of cathartic expression and poetic activism—protest and beauty.



Description:

Habitus is a system of embodied dispositions, tendencies that organize how individuals perceive the social world around them and react to it.

The portfolio Habitus: Contemplative Manifesto offers a platform for printmakers to express, comment, and reflect on the current issues that are rapidly reshaping our world—creating a print that is not reactive—but pensive and meditative.

Is there still a place for a lasting image in the sea of endlessly updating news feeds? In turbulent times, it can become overwhelming to observe the torrent of information flowing past, and all too easy to become swept up in the churning tide. Can we find pause within such an environment and create imagery that is not merely pamphletary and reactive but portrays the contemplative moment before our responses?

Printmaking’s legacy as a medium of widespread distribution of ideas has been challenged in the 21st century by the scrolling social media feed. Can our voices still be heard over the din of endless conversations?  Can artists react to the contemporary turmoil creating prints that transcend objective imagery?
This portfolio is a collection of visual contemplative manifestos to those who engage with the history of printmaking as a platform for sharing issues and create work that slows one down, that proposes change and creates pause. We aim to gather the voices of cathartic expression and poetic activism—protest and beauty.

“Habitus is neither a result of free will, nor determined by structures, but created by a kind of interplay between the two over time: dispositions that are both shaped by past events and structures, and that shape current practices and structures and also, importantly, that condition our very perceptions of these” (Bourdieu 1984: 170). In this sense habitus is created and reproduced unconsciously, ‘without any deliberate pursuit of coherence… without any conscious concentration’ (ibid: 170).

Edition size: 32 (30 participants, 1 copy for SGCI Archives, 1 copy for Organizer Archives, additionally one of the organizer’s copies will be donated to the UNF Gallery Collection)

Paper Size: 20” x 15” Vertical, Full Bleed

Media: All media will be considered including Intaglio, Relief, Screenprint, Lithography, and Letterpress. Digital prints will be accepted if used in combination with any traditional process. Work must be no thicker than ¼”

Cost: the organizers are asking for participants to contribute $35 towards the cost of portfolio enclosures and shipping. This cost does not include framing work for exhibition at the Lufrano Gallery at the University of North Florida.*

*In addition to being showcased as part of the 2019 SGCI Conference, the organizers are working to exhibit the work at the Lufrano Intercultural Gallery at the University of North Florida. This unique gallery showcases artwork that addresses issues of social and cultural importance. Exhibition dates forthcoming.



Hand Draughted


Organizer:

Ken Wood, Professor, St. Louis Community College
http://kenwoodstudio.com



Email:

kcwood@gmail.com



Abstract:

This portfolio will explore printmakers' use of traditional architectural draughting techniques, such as perspective drawing, isometric and axonometric projections, and plans and sections. It will also be open to printmakers whose work shows clearly the use of tools borrowed from the (pre-Autocad) draughting room: parallel rules and triangles, inking pens, mylar, vellum, letterpress letters and chartpak patterns, and pantone sticky-back film. Work need not be solely about draughting, but draughting should be a recognizable component of the print. This portfolio focuses on the 'exchange' part of Texchange: the exchange between the legacy processes of the architecture and printmaking worlds.



Description:

The theme is draughting––methods and materials. While the finished image will be printed (any printmaking method or combination of methods can be used, as long as at least one method is hand-pulled), it should refer to or be created (at least in part) using traditional hand-draughting. Methods can include perspective drawing, axonometric or isometric projections, and plans sections and elevations. Or, if the connection to draughting is evident, it could be created using tools/techniques associated with the draughting table: parallel rule/triangle, compass, french curves, eraser shields, triple-aught inking pens, sticky-back film, insane stippling, full-page-width single hatch, superimpostion of systems a la HVAC with Structural, cyanotype (blueprint) fuzzy line aesthetic, blending markers, Wrightian crossed-line corners, photocopy scalies, Corbusian stencil numbers, or chartpak or letterpress patterns/letters. Images do not have to look like architecture; any expression of form is welcome.

Portfolio, when distributed, will include a colophon and 12 prints, and will be encased in a silkscreened envelope. The silkscreened image (single color) will include pictorial references to each of the prints inside (each artist will determine how their print will be referred to in its 'thumbnail' version on the cover).

This portfolio focuses on the 'exchange' part of Texchange: the exchange between the legacy processes of the architecture and printmaking worlds. (The 'Tex' part of Texchange is more subjective: this idea came to me when I was an architecture student in Texas, pre-Autocadd, and had just discovered this wonderful new class called Lithography in the art department at Rice University).

Jurors for the portfolio will be Ken Wood and one other (tbd).

Edition size: 14 (12 participants, 1 copy for SGCI Archives, 1 display copy)

Paper Size: 12" x 15" (horizontal or vertical format, bleed print or with borders). Paper can be any archival paper or film.



The Laser Printmaker: Mapping overlaps between printmaking and laser systems


Organizer:

Dana Potter, MFA Candidate, University of Tennessee Knoxville
http://www.danapotterart.com



Email:

danarenepotter@gmail.com



Abstract:

Postdigital, emerging technologies, and new media, to name a few, are vague terms used as catch-all funnels for print processes which incorporate laser-cutting, 3D printing, CNC routing, etc. The funnel metaphor, however, stanches fluidity between printmaking techniques and incorporated technologies. A re-imagined structure of these methods may be presented as tree roots with equal stems for laser systems as printmaking’s relationship with paper-making or book-arts. Laser technologies specifically build on similar conceptual questions brought up by printmaking: quality of technique, loss of aura in mechanical reproduction, the look and feel of the hand-made, and issues of physical and time-based labor.



Description:

Whether it be screenprint or monoprint laser-cut stencils, pressure-printed laser-cut blocks, relief printed laser-engraved plates, etc., this portfolio will collect a broad-spectrum of possible laser and print combinations. By doing so, conclusions can be drawn about the specific aesthetic and conceptual impact of incorporating lasers with print.

The use of laser systems is no longer a novelty. With the blossoming abundance of maker-spaces in public, member-based, and private businesses, access to laser technologies is nearing an equal level to that of printing presses. The versatility of both laser systems and printing presses, encircles overlapping grooves for a plethora of crafters, makers, artists, engineers, and architects in libraries, wood shops, fabrication labs, print shops, and craft spaces.

Due to its current status as an new, experimental process, laser technologies with printmaking inherently relate to Texchanges theme of transformative practices by modifying existing print processes. Merging the two processes is a natural method for discovery, such as the embossing of laser-burnt surfaces onto paper.

In relation to Texchange’s themes of contributive art media, this portfolio will strengthen the current relationship between print and laser technologies. By defining the breath of possible overlaps between prints and laser-cutting, we can position printmaking as a leading contributor to art-based laser cutting and engraving. For a truly cooperative inclusivity, we will exchange not only prints, but a detailed description of all techniques used by the participating artists. In this way we can formally document the expanse of laser-printmaker combinations and thereby be inspired, perhaps to teach a course on the variability of laser-printmaker techniques, or to write a book about laser systems and printmaking. Even so, we will surely signal a much needed, neatly tightened network for laser-printmakers to be in touch with each other.

By establishing more stable roots for laser systems in printmaking, we can, in the future, expand to like-minded portfolios for 3D printing, and perhaps, in the future, other, ever stranger technologies to come.

Edition size: 23 (21 participants, 1 copy for SGCI Archives, 1 display copy)

Paper Size: 14“ x 18“ including 14“ x 18“ glassine interleaving

Deadline: January 11, 2019

Cost: $15, $10 for students, plus the cost of shipping for sending your prints and receiving the portfolio



Make it Work: Printshop Posters


Organizer:

Leslie Friedman, Assistant Professor of Printmaking and Foundations, Louisana State University; and Sean P. Morrissey, Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas
https://lesliepvd.com
http://www.seanpmorrissey.com



Email:

lesliepvd@gmail.com

seanpmorrissey@gmail.com



Abstract:

Sometimes humorous, sometimes passive-aggressive, occasionally inspirational, and always informational, printshop signs shift standards of what is often a sterile conversation about shop etiquette. Participants will explore this unique form of communication through printed matter that pays homage to the common printshop sign. These broadsides provide voice and point of view, elevating how we learn from each other and how we are able interact and relay pertinent information.



Description:

The communal printshop is a site of exchange, with new ideas and techniques influencing those that share the space. Within this ink splotched paradise, however, there needs to be some ground rules or else chaos ensues. From an infographic on how to remove ink from a can (no gouging!), to a skull and crossbones drawn above acid, a coffee cup tacked to a “no food or drink” sign, to a hand-lettered H-O-T taped above a hotplate, shared print studios are rich with messaging. Sometimes humorous, sometimes passive-aggressive, occasionally inspirational, and always informational, these signs shift standards of what is often a sterile conversation about printshop etiquette.

Artists will explore this unique form of communication through printed matter that pays homage to the common printshop sign. These broadsides provide voice and point of view, elevating how we learn from each other and how we are able interact and relay pertinent information. This portfolio celebrates the unique ways in which we communicate, collaborate, and foster community within our creative spaces.

Prints in this portfolio will vary in size and shape, but will not exceed 11 in. x 17 in. Participants will express what genre of sign they would like to make so that the co-organizers of this portfolio can make sure that there are a range of messages expressed in these prints.



Mentoring Circles


Organizer:

Candace Garlock, Professor, Truckee Meadows Community College
http://www.candacegarlock.com



Email:

cgarlock@tmcc.edu



Abstract:

As printmakers, we learn from each other We grow, first as students and then gradually we become mentors ourselves We take bits of information from everyone we can learn from We blend techniques, ideas, bonding thoughts together to create something new There are traces of knowledge transferred from one mentor to another, creating circles of memory, expanding our pool of influence Through these shared experiences, we transform what printmaking is and can become, creating change together This portfolio exchange will pay homage to our mentors.



Description:

As printmakers, we learn from each other. We grow, first as students and then gradually we become mentors ourselves. We take bits of information from everyone we can learn from. We blend techniques, ideas, bonding thoughts together to create something new. There are traces of knowledge transferred from one mentor to another, creating circles of memory, expanding our pool of influence. Through these shared experiences, we transform what printmaking is and can become, creating change together.

This portfolio exchange will pay homage to our mentors. Participants are asked to examine the intersections of their knowledge and begin to visually make connections to the art of their mentors. The prints will physically be cut into a 15” circle. Each participant will be asked to write a statement about their mentor or mentors’ influence, thus contributing to TEXchange by documenting our shared experiences.

Edition: 25 (23 participants, 1 copy for SGCI Archives, 1 display copy)

Paper Size: 15” diameter circle cut to size.

Remember to use fold over glassine or acid free bags cut to exact size of the print (15”x15”.) Make sure to include your artist statement and artist bio. Enclose one with each print for this project. This will help with collating and for collection needs.

Make sure to fill out the forms for SGCI Archives. Only one set of forms needs to be printed and signed. The forms need to be typed, not hand written.

Fee: $40.00 send to address below or to paypal: cgarlock@tmcc.edu
The fee is due November 1, 2018 (This fee is non-refundable.)

Final Due Date for Prints to be shipped to Nevada is January 18, 2019.

Ship to:
Candace Garlock
Truckee Meadows Community College
7000 Dandini Blvd. RDMT 334C
Reno, NV 89512



Objects Printed: Reconsidering the Material World


Organizer:

Mike Sonnichsen, Assistant Professor, University of Idaho



Email:

msonic@uidaho.edu



Abstract:

For many printmakers, found objects occupy a central or generative point in an art making practice. This portfolio explores the intersection of objects and the transformation or "change" in how we regard familiar things through direct (or very nearly direct) print processes. The particular biases of object printmaking offer details, nuances, and visual filters that reveal qualities otherwise unseen through traditional depiction. The sensibilities of a printmaker employing found objects and the "printerly" manner in which they apprehend and then re-express aspects of our material culture, ultimately changes the relationship between matter, artist, and audience.



Description:

What happens when objects or materials not usually considered part of the print matrix vocabulary are recorded with (or subjected to) the biases of printmaking processes? While the initial impulse asking, "what happens when I run an object through the press?" could lead to disaster, clever print-art practitioners have employed specific sensibilities, problem solving skills, and vision as they translate dimensional objects onto a flattened substrate. I suggest that familiarity with the "operative nature" of printmaking fine-tunes a print artist's sensibilities to see, feel, and want to understand what unseen material-reality certain physical objects might reveal when directly translated into print. Working with a given object places the artist within a tangible, material context, but offers opportunities to change or alter "what is" or "what we think we see and know". The changes that arise as these familiar objects are reconsidered on "printerly" terms, create new conceptual and visual relationships that oscillate between the “object itself" and “printed object” truths. While exploring the ordinary, an object printmaker brings a curiosity and a co-creative sense that believes print mechanics can elevate the quotidian and reveal both inherent and unexpected qualities even if at first unseen.

Edition size: 20 (18 participants, 1 copy for SGCI Archives, 1 display copy)

Paper Size: 20"x20"

Acceptable types of work: Hand print techniques including relief, intaglio (soft-ground etching, ex.), collagraph, monotype, lithography (ink-transfers, ex.) with an emphasis on directly printed objects are acceptable. Certain "nearly direct" photo-process techniques (photo-litho, photo-screenprint, photo-gravure etc.) may also be used. No digital output please.
*An edition may be slightly varied owing to material or monotyping variations.

Cost: $45 (shipping & portfolio)

Print Delivery/Due Date : January 18, 2019



Printmaking As Partnership


Organizer:

Zach Clark
http://www.nationalmonumentpress.com



Email:

zach@zachclarkis.com



Abstract:

Printmaking, specifically the act of publishing and printing for others, is often reduced purely to its commercial production and market role. In doing so, one ignores the inherent values of printmaking: it’s ability to cultivate relationships and collaborations, with the most ideal instances pushing a printmaker to expand beyond their comfort zones both practically and conceptually, themes that intersect with the goals of Texchange.

Printmaking as Partnership is a portfolio exchange centered around the value and strength of the collaborative process in printmaking, including work by 15 printmakers and their collaborators.



Description:

One of the largest roles of a printmaker is in publishing their work and producing work for others. Those who wish to consider this as a pejorative consider the act of publishing purely through commercial means. In doing so, one would miss out on the most inherent values of printmaking: it’s ability to cultivate relationships and collaborations, with the most ideal instances pushing a printmaker to expand beyond their comfort zones both practically and conceptually, themes that intersect with the goals of Texchange. These opportunities to grow are beneficial to the practice of print publication, but translate to needs in society at large, especially in our current times of increased polarization and tribalism that encourages us to stay set in our ways.

Within this portfolio, 15 printmakers will work with a collaborator of their choice to complete an edition of work inspired by the exchange of ideas present in collaboration and partnership. Each edition includes 30 prints to recognize the shared effort of the partnership. With collaborators coming from both within and outside of the art world, each duo is forced to work beyond their typical habits and approach making in a new way influenced by the ideas of their collaborator, coming together to find a common vernacular and visual language.

Work within Printmaking as Partnership is open to any medium on a paper size of 8x8”.

Artists wishing to apply to be part of Printmaking as Partnership should include links to where their work can be seen/social media, and a brief bio of both the applying artist and their intended collaborator.

Edition size: 32 (15 participants + 15 collaborators, 1 copy for SGCI Archives, 1 display copy)

Paper Size: 8“ x 8“



Saints, Superheroes, and The Demonized


Organizer:

Marco Sanchez, MFA Candidate, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania



Email:

marcoartsanchez@gmail.com



Abstract:

Saints, Superheroes, and The Demonized is an exchange that is meant to serve as a platform for printmakers to become reactionaries and revolutionaries who take a stand against the xenophobia, racism, and disregard of common decency lacking by the current presidential administration. This exchange will allow printmakers to represent the people in their communities who over the past two years have been marginalized or demonized. By refuting the ill-informed rhetoric of some politicians, it will allow artists to elevate these "Saints, Superheroes, and Demons" to the pedestal in which they belong.



Description:

Being Texan, specifically from a border town like the El Paso/Juarez region, as individuals we are given a unique perspective into the multicultural nature that is meant to epitomize the United States. My current body of work revolves around the current societal issues affecting thousands of families today, most of which are caused by the current presidential administration and their policies, along with their toxic and fallacious rhetoric directed towards immigrants, people of color, women, and the LGBTQIA community.

Living on the border gives the people in the region a mentality not found in many other places of the United States, there are higher levels of tolerance, acceptance, and sense of community. However, living on the border does not mean it is without its share of intolerant, xenophobic, or racism remarks or confrontations. In fact, in the early 1900’s people crossing from Juarez to what is now El Paso often suffered extreme discrimination and dehumanization, where before being allowed into the U.S., they were forced to strip naked and doused in lye for “screening” (for homosexuality, low IQ, physical deformities) and for delousing purposes. This in fact was how America inspired the Nazi Third Reich in their treatment of Jewish people during the holocaust. It has been over a quarter of a millennia since the United States became a sovereign nation, and despite the large strides for people of color, women, and most minorities to be treated as equals by those of European decent, as a nation, we keep falling short. This Texchange portfolio will serve as a platform for those who have felt racism, been through xenophobic confrontations, who identify or can empathize with someone who has suffered said prejudices. It will allow artists to shine a light to their “abuelitas”, mothers, fathers, siblings, spouses, friends, and even the corner “taqueros and eloteros” and elevate them to their state of “sainthood”, “superhero”, or if they wish, a xenophobe haunting “demon”.

This print exchange is meant to be reactionary, it is meant to be tongue in cheek with a sense of validation for those who we are meant to represent. Myself being a Mexican immigrant, felt personally attacked by many of the remarks being spewed by the current administration, I now reside in rural Pennsylvania, where I’ve come to feel welcome by many, but demonized by a considerable amount of people. This exchange is important because it will address these current social issues that optimistically will creating a dialogue across the board and hopefully people come to understand that protests, diversity, inclusion, and migration are fundamentally, American.

Edition size: 23 (20 participants, 1 copy for SGCI Archives, 2 display copies)

Paper Size: 11“ x 15“



A Shrinking World


Organizer:

Andrew Mullally, Assistant Printmaking Facility Technician, Columbia College Chicago



Email:

mullally.andrew@gmail.com



Abstract:

Contemplating the triage of human affairs, it is difficult to envision any list where addressing climate change does not rank among the most critical imperatives. Ecological disaster, mass extinction, and global warming; all household phrases. Notions of “nature” easily become entangled in nostalgia. In romanticism. Beyond this, they are most importantly political and urgent. Shrinking World encourages both artist and audience to consider the natural world as something more than the spaces and images we have designated as nature. The Anthropocene is not some far off idea that denies individuals agency. Nature, and its potential collapse, is at your doorstep.



Description:

Humanity has entered a new geologic age wherein our actions have become the dominant influence steering both climate and biodiversity. This new era is one of mass extinction and ecological disaster. Half of the extant flora and fauna have disappeared in the last forty years, and scientific studies project that the remaining nine million species will again halve by the end of the century. Although extinction cycles are no stranger to this planet, this sixth iteration is unique in that is being driven primarily by human consumption. The strain which humankind currently exerts on this planet’s resources can no longer be offset by the built-in system delays that have allowed Earth to recover from ecological disasters for so many centuries. It has been claimed that in order to sustain our current level of consumption, we would need a planet 1.5-2 times the size of the one we currently inhabit. The hubris of human enterprise that continues to drive dramatic shifts in climate and steep losses in biodiversity encircles each and every one of us. While we may not have been a part of the worst generation, our collective actions in these next few decades might ensure that we were part of one of the very last.

Nature is a human convention that extends far beyond the public spaces we have designated as bastions for its existence; it is far larger and much more near than the exotic documentaries and images we consume on a daily basis. In order for individual citizens, for stewards, of this biosphere to incite any positive change we must adjust how we define nature. With the exotification of the natural world there comes a diffusion of responsibility for its very wellbeing.
A Shrinking World is a half sheet print exchange and exhibition that encourages both artist and audience to reconsider our collective relationship to the natural world. Activist art is typically predicated on a presumption of guilt; it can be heavy handed and polarize the conversation. Perhaps what is most vital to creating a meaningful discourse is a not a hard shove but a subtle push. One that enables humankind to stop seeing itself as separate from the natural world, and begin seeing itself as an integral part of it. Activism is most effective at a local level. Extinction, deforestation, and climate change are all realities perceptible in our own backyards.

Edition size: 22 (20 participants, 1 copy for SGCI Archives, 1 display copy)

Paper Size: 15” x 20”

Cost: $30



Southern Hospitality


Organizer:

M. Robyn Wall, Assistant Professor of Art, Delta State University
https://mrobynwall.com



Email:

m.robynwall@gmail.com



Abstract:

Southern Hospitality is a depiction of the cultural and sociopolitical landscape of the American South. As a region rich in history, it is transforming as a place of dialogue for diverse ideas and identities.



Description:

What is southern hospitality and its role in the contemporary South?

Southern hospitality relies on the stereotype of politeness, charity and charm of bucolic small towns. It is the ideal of a traditional way of life branded as quintessentially American. Governed by unwritten rules, southern hospitality has been subject to change.

The borders of The South are debatable. Often the region is defined by Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas. However, southern traditions have not been bound to these places and have spread to peripheral states. As an area historically known for agriculture and rural populations, the regional identities have transformed particularly in larger cities due to urbanization.

Throughout these states there is spectrum of climates from subtropical to arid desert with extreme weather such as hurricanes, tornados and flooding. Natives’ and transplants’ perceptions vary based on their experiences and adapting to locale.

Southern Hospitality is a portfolio creating a dialogue about living and printing in the Southern United States.

Artists include 3 examples of work for submission.

Edition size: 22 (20 participants, 1 copy for SGCI Archives, 1 display copy)

Paper Size: 11“ x 14“ with glassine interleaving

Media: Any traditional printmaking medium. No purely digital or 3D prints.

Participation Fee: $40 paid after notification of acceptance